Friday, December 8, 2017

Famous Political Assassinations in the Last Two Centuries: How They Affected the World


Famous Political Assassinations in the Last Two Centuries: How They Affected the World

Countries, continents and the world at large have experienced jolts that moved these entities away from their evolutionary if not reformatory paths, resulting in seismic changes that transform them in fundamental ways. One of the potent catalysts to these changes have been assassinations, as they have led to wars, political changes and even economic changes.  In this account, we are presented with an insight of world renowned assassinations, among which are:
·         Franz Ferdinand: The Archduke and heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne who was killed by the Bosnian Serb nationalists Gavrilo Princip in 1914

·         John F. Kennedy: The legendary American president that steered America away from a nuclear war with the Soviet Union, thereby saving humanity, but was killed, supposedly, by Lee Harvey Oswald in 1963

·         Patrice Lumumba: The first democratically elected leader of the infant nation of Congo (the former Belgian Congo) who was liquidated in 1961, plunging the country into a chaos that has claimed more than ten million lives, and that Congo has not recovered from for close to six decades after his death

·         Mahatma Gandhi: The preeminent leader of the Indian independence movement that led to India’s independence from British-ruled. He is also recognized as the father of nonviolent civil disobedience, who posthumously inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world

·         Abraham Lincoln: The American president who abolished slavery, led America through a civil-war and got killed by John Wilkes Booth in 1865

·         Felix-Roland Moumie: The Cameroonian pro-independence leader assassinated in Geneva in 1960 by the SDECE (French secret service) with thallium

·         And dozens more!

A heart-rending insight into politics. Geopolitics, international conspiracies and secret agendas.










 











Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Longest Serving Heads of State in the World that are Non-Royals


Rank
Name
Country
Office
Tenure began
Length of tenure
1.
Prime Minister, then President[1]
30 June 1975
42 years, 144 days
2.
President[2]
3 August 1979
38 years, 110 days
3.
 Iran
President, then Supreme Leader[3]
13 October 1981
36 years, 39 days
4.
Prime Minister, then First Secretary,
then President[4]
22 March 1984
33 years, 244 days
5.
President[5]
8 February 1979 – 31 August 1992 (1st time)
25 October 1997 – present (2nd time)
33 years, 232 days
6.
Prime Minister[6]
14 January 1985
32 years, 311 days
7.
President
26 January 1986
31 years, 299 days
8.
President[7]
30 June 1989
28 years, 144 days
9.
 Chad
President[8]
2 December 1990
26 years, 354 days
10.
President[9]
27 April 1991
26 years, 208 days
11.
Acting Head of State,
then President[10]
19 November 1992
25 years, 2 days
12.
Vice-President, then President[11]
19 July 1994
23 years, 125 days
13.
President
20 July 1994
23 years, 124 days
14.
Prime Minister[12]
20 July 1996 – 4 August 2003 (1st time)
6 August 2003 – present (2nd time)
21 years, 122 days
15.
Acting Head of State,
then President[13]
4 March 1981 – 25 April 1990 (1st time)
10 January 2007 – present (2nd time)
20 years, 2 days
16.
President of the Presidium of the
Supreme People's Assembly[14]
5 September 1998
19 years, 77 days
17.
Prime Minister
23 November 1998
18 years, 363 days
18.
President
27 April 1999
18 years, 208 days
19.
President
8 May 1999
18 years, 197 days
20.
Prime Minister, then President[15]
9 August 1999 – 7 May 2000 (1st term as Prime Minister)
8 May 2000 – 7 May 2008 (1st term as President)
8 May 2008 – 7 May 2012 (2nd term as Prime Minister)
7 May 2012 – present (2nd term as President)
18 years, 104 days
21.
Prime Minister
22 June 1995 – 9 July 2008 (1st time)
20 February 2013 – present (2nd time)
17 years, 291 days
22.
Prime Minister, then President[16]
21 March 1990 – 28 August 2002 (1st time)
4 December 2012 – present (2nd time)
17 years, 147 days
23.
President
17 July 2000
17 years, 127 days
24.
President
17 January 2001
16 years, 308 days
25.
Prime Minister
29 March 2001
16 years, 237 days
26.
Prime Minister
26 July 1996 – 29 September 2003 (1st time)
23 October 2008 – present (2nd time)
16 years, 93 days
27.
De Facto Head of State,
then President[17]
25 February 1980 – 25 January 1988 (1st time)
12 August 2010 – present (2nd time)
15 years, 70 days
28.
Prime Minister, then President[18]
14 March 2003
14 years, 252 days
29.
President[19]
22 May 2003
14 years, 183 days
30.
Prime Minister, then President[20]
4 August 2003
14 years, 109 days
31.
Prime Minister
29 October 2003
14 years, 23 days
32.
Prime Minister, then President[21]
12 December 2003
13 years, 344 days
33.
Prime Minister
23 June 1996 – 15 July 2001 (1st time)
6 January 2009 – present (2nd time)
13 years, 341 days
34.
Prime Minister
8 January 2004
13 years, 317 days
35.
Prime Minister, then President[22]
19 March 2003 – 6 September 2003 (1st time)
15 January 2005 – present (2nd time)
13 years, 116 days
36.
Prime Minister
12 August 2004
13 years, 101 days
37.
President
1 January 2001 – 15 January 2009 (1st time)
17 January 2013 – present (2nd time)
12 years, 322 days
38.
 Togo
President[23]
5 February 2005 – 25 February 2005 (1st time)
4 May 2005 – present (2nd time)
12 years, 221 days
39.
President[24]
30 July 2005
12 years, 114 days
40.
President
26 August 2005
12 years, 87 days
41.
Federal Chancellor
22 November 2005
11 years, 364 days
42.
President
16 January 2006
11 years, 309 days
43.
President
22 January 2006
11 years, 303 days
44.
Prime Minister
18 June 1996 – 6 July 1999 (1st time)
31 March 2009 – present (2nd time)
11 years, 252 days
45.
Prime Minister
6 July 1998 – 27 May 2002 (1st time)
29 May 2010 – present (2nd time)
11 years, 136 days
46.
 Cuba
First Secretary, President
and Prime Minister[25]
31 July 2006
11 years, 113 days
47.
Federal Council Member,
currently President[26]
1 August 2006
11 years, 112 days
48.
 Fiji
Acting Head of State,
then Prime Minister[27]
29 May 2000 – 13 July 2000 (1st time)
5 December 2006 – present (2nd time)
11 years, 31 days
49.
President[28]
21 December 2006
10 years, 335 days
50.
Prime Minister, then President[29]
25 March 2007
10 years, 241 days
51.
Prime Minister
31 December 1995 – 15 December 1998 (1st time)
5 May 2003 – 24 May 2006 (2nd time)
23 June 2008 – 3 September 2012 (3rd time)
16 August 2017 – present (4th time)
10 years, 172 days
52.
 Mali
Prime Minister, then President[30]
4 February 1994 – 15 February 2000 (1st time)
4 September 2013 – present (2nd time)
10 years, 89 days
53.
President
7 September 2007
10 years, 75 days
54.
President
17 September 2007
10 years, 65 days
55.
Prime Minister, then President[32]
7 November 1990 – 9 December 1993 (1st time)
4 December 2010 – present (2nd time)
10 years, 19 days